Courses in English - Spring 2020

The courses offered are subject to change. Time, syllabus and descriptions to be updated...

Courses offered on Bachelor's level:

  1. Social Psychological Theory
  2. Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease
  3. The Feeling of Being: The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness
  4. An introduction to Sports and eSports Psychology
  5. Feedback Informed Treatment - Cancelled!
  6. Brain and Cognitive Development
  7. Nudges towards better decisions - New course

Courses offered on Master's level:

  1. The Feeling of Being: The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness
  2. An Introduction to Sports and eSports Psychology
  3. Feedback Informed Treatment - Cancelled!
  4. Brain and Cognitive Development
  5. Planning and analysis of interventional studies
  6. The psychosocial work environment, stress and organisational behaviour: issues in assessment and intervention
  7. Nudges towards better decisions - New course


Courses offered on Bachelor's level

Social Psychological Theory (15 ECTS) 

Wednesday 8 a.m. - 11 a.m., CSS room 2-2-24, weeks 6-14 and 16-21

Thomas Morton

Course description:
The course Social Psychological Theory introduces the student to the subject field of social psychology. Here is the central focus on the relationship between the individual and the society and in particular how the former gets integrated in to the latter.
In answering the question of social integration, the course deals with two different overarching approaches: The psychological social psychology where the individual is the main focus, and sociological social psychology where it is the society. Based on group work, student and teacher presentations, we explore older and contemporary social psychological theories focusing on concepts such as individualisation processes, groups, attitudes, roles etc. In applying the theories, topics such as family, youth, integration, identity, culture and ethnicity are discussed.

Exam registration requirements: 75 % attendance, active participation such as student presentations, group work, discussions and response papers.

Final exam: Final compulsory written 72-hour take-home assignment. The written take-home assignment can only be taken individually. The extent of the written take-home assignment is a maximum of ten standard pages.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb16001u/2019-2020

Literature coming soon.



Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease (5 ECTS)

Mondays 1 p.m. - 3 p.m., CSS room 2-2-24, weeks 6-14 and 16-21

Jesper Kristiansen

Course description:
Can psychosocial conditions at work cause disease? What are the mechanisms? How do we assess and quantify psychosocial conditions and their effects? How can we intervene against job stress? These and other questions are the topics for the course. The course is interdisciplinary, and will introduce commonly used models of work-related stress, as well as broadly applicable methods for measuring the physiological effects of stress on the body. These methods are useful in understanding the effects of job stress and psychosocial stressors on health and wellbeing, with applications for cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression, metabolic illness, and other chronic diseases. The course includes both structured lectures that introduce and review various concepts and methods, and group work were where students are encouraged to engage with fellow students and researchers. These lectures and group work cover topics such as models of psychosocial job stress, mechanisms between psychosocial job stress and health, critical discussion of the association between job stress and chronic diseases, and job stress interventions.

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation.

Final exam: Free written exam to be handed in at the end of the course. The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum three students. Length of the paper: max. 8 pages for 1 student, max.12 pages for 2 students, max. 14 pages for 3 students.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11727u/2019-2020 

Literature

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (10 ECTS)

Thursdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room  2-2-36, weeks 6-14 and 16-17

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

Course description:
This course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are encouraged throughout the course to actively participate in discussions and to make critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind.

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation

Final exam: Free written assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule. The exam paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students. 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

You can read more about the course https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11736u/2019-2020

Literature

An Introduction to Sports and eSports Psychology (10 ECTS)

Mondays 10 a.m. - 1. p.m., CSS room  2-2-30, weeks 6-14 and 17-18

Ingo Zettler

Course description:
Sport is a crucial aspect of many people's lives. In fact, many people do, watch, and/or talk about sport. Doing sport and/or watching sport affects one’s emotions, feelings, fitness, health, self-view, social relations etc.
In this elective course, we will learn about different psychological and psychological-based aspects related to sport. Examples of topics are cognitions, gender, emotions, leadership, motivation, performance, social relations, team dynamics, or the role of spectators. The majority of the classes will focus on “traditional” sports, but we will also focus on eSports in one or two of the classes.

Exam registration requirements:

  1. Each student must attend minimum 75% of the classes (i.e., attend minimum 8 classes).
  2. Each student must read the curriculum paper related to a class before the class (because the activities/discussion in class are based on the paper).
  3. Each student must submit an exam that summarizes relevant literature with regard to a self-chosen topic from the field of Sport and eSports Psychology.

Final exam: Extent of written assignment: Maximum 14 pages. Each student must submit an exam that summarizes relevant literature with regard to a self-chosen topic from the field of Sport and eSports Psychology. More detailed information about the active participation and exam will be presented in the first class. The exam can only be taken individually. 

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11739u/2019-2020

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (10 ECTS) 

Fridays 12 noon - 15 p.m., CSS room  7-0-22 , weeks 6-14 and 16-17 

Rikke Papsøe

Course description:
Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration.
This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection. 

Exam registration requirements: Minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. Active participation in class is a precondition to be able to write the exam paper. In each session of the course, students participate in group discussions on relevant topics and cases from practice, and they demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the following class reflection. Students also participate in training with therapeutic methods and with the outcome management tools presented in class.

Final exam: Written assignment. Free home assignment. The assignment shall be max. 12 pages by 1 student, max. 15 pages by 2 students and max. 18 pages by 3 students

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11738u/2019-2020

Literature

Brain and Cognitive Development (10 ECTS)

Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2-1-12, teaching weeks 6-14 and 16-17

Victoria Helen Southgate

Course description:
Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

Exam registration requirements: For all elective subjects, minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. This will involve presenting an assigned paper to the class either individually or as part of a group.

Final exam: Written assignment. Set assignment with a choice of 4 essay questions. Max 12 pages for one student, 15 pages for 2 students and 18 pages for 3 students

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11737u/2019-2020

Literature

Nudges towards better decisions v/ Robert Böhm (10 ECTS)

Tuesday 3-5 pm., CSS room 2-2-36, teaching weeks 6-14 and 16-20

Robert Böhm

Course description:
Consuming environmentally-friendly products, registering as an organ donor, or receiving a vaccination – these decisions may have important consequences for the decision mak-er but also for society. How can one increase the quality of individual decisions while not blocking certain options and therefore restricting the decision makers’ freedom of choice? This course deals with the question how to change the choice architecture in order to im-prove decisions, so-called “nudges”. The course will cover (a) nudges’ theoretical founda-tion, (b) various examples of application in different areas of decision making, and (c) how to integrate nudges into policy making. It utilizes a multi-disciplinary perspective on human decision-making, including research papers from psychology, philosophy, eco-nomics, and related areas.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11744u/2019-2020

Literature coming soon



Courses offered on Master's level

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (7.5 ECTS) 

Thursdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room  2-2-36, weeks 6-14 and 16-17

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

Course description:
This course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are encouraged throughout the course to actively participate in discussions and to make critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind.

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation

Final exam: Written assignment. Free written assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule. The exam paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students. 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages.

You can reade more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15736u/2019-2020                            

Literature

An Introduction to Sports and eSports Psychology (7.5 ECTS)

Mondays 10 a.m. - 1. p.m., CSS room  2-2-30, weeks 6-14 and 17-18

Ingo Zettler

Course description:
Sport is a crucial aspect of many people's lives. In fact, many people do, watch, and/or talk about sport. Doing sport and/or watching sport affects one’s emotions, feelings, fitness, health, self-view, social relations etc.
In this elective course, we will learn about different psychological and psychological-based aspects related to sport. Examples of topics are cognitions, gender, emotions, leadership, motivation, performance, social relations, team dynamics, or the role of spectators. The majority of the classes will focus on “traditional” sports, but we will also focus on eSports in one or two of the classes.

Exam registration requirements:

  1. Each student must attend minimum 75% of the classes (i.e., attend minimum 8 classes).
  2. Each student must read the curriculum paper related to a class before the class (because the activities/discussion in class are based on the paper).
  3. Each student must submit an exam that summarizes relevant literature with regard to a self-chosen topic from the field of Sport and eSports Psychology.

Final exam: Extent of written assignment: Maximum 14 pages. Each student must submit an exam that summarizes relevant literature with regard to a self-chosen topic from the field of Sport and eSports Psychology. More detailed information about the active participation and exam will be presented in the first class. The exam can only be taken individually. 

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15739u/2019-2020

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (7.5 ECTS) 

Fridays 12 noon - 15 p.m., CSS room  7-0-22 , weeks 6-14 and 16-17 

Rikke Papsøe

Course description:
Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration.
This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection. 

Exam registration requirements: Minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. Active participation in class is a precondition to be able to write the exam paper. In each session of the course, students participate in group discussions on relevant topics and cases from practice, and they demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the following class reflection. Students also participate in training with therapeutic methods and with the outcome management tools presented in class.

Final exam: Written assignment. Free home assignment. The assignment shall be max. 12 pages by 1 student, max. 15 pages by 2 students and max. 18 pages by 3 students

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15738u/2019-2020

Literature

Brain and Cognitive Development (7.5 ECTS) 

Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2-1-12, teaching weeks 6-14 and 16-17

Victoria Helen Southgate

Course description:
Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

Exam registration requirements: For all elective subjects, minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. This will involve presenting an assigned paper to the class either individually or as part of a group.

Final exam: Written assignment. Set assignment with a choice of 4 essay questions. Max 12 pages for one student, 15 pages for 2 students and 18 pages for 3 students

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15737u/2019-2020

Literature



Planning and analysis of interventional studies (7.5 ECTS) 

Thursdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 1-1-12, weeks 6-14 and 16-21

Matthias Gondan

NOTE: This course has a pass-fail examination. Therefore, it is not possible to receive a letter-grade.

Course description:
Using examples from clinical studies in psychology and medicine, we review the basic study design in clinical trials, including statistical tests and sample size planning. Step by step we learn how to extend the methodology to adjust for baseline performance, to analyze subgroups, to do interim analyses, to test for equivalence instead of difference, to deal with missing data, to deal with multiple outcome variables, to analyze binary data, count data, and event times, to deal with clustered data (e.g. group therapy), and to compare natural (i.e., not randomized groups). In the end, students will be able to plan and analyze of standard study designs in real world-settings, including basic preprocessing of data, import and export of different files, and standardized reporting. Most of the analyses will be done with SPSS, but the participants will also need to acquire some basic R skills.

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation.

Final exam: Written examination, 90 minutes. Written assignment at Peter Bangs Vej.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15619u/2019-2020

Literature

The psychosocial work environment, well-being, stress and organizational behaviours: issues in assessment and management (7.5 ECTS) 

Mondays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2-2-24, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Paul Conway

NOTE: This course has a pass-fail examination. Therefore, it is not possible to receive a letter-grade.

Course description:
Work and Organisational Psychology studies the relationship between individuals, work and organisations, as well as the assessment of, intervention in and evaluation of the organisational, group and individual demands and opportunities associated with mastering the functions of an organisation.
The objectives of the module in Work and Organisational Psychology are to provide students with an advanced introduction to theory and practices in relation to working conditions and forms of groups and organisations, as well as methods of management that promote individual and organisational skills enhancement, performance and well-being.
Which factors of the psychosocial work environment lead to stress, low work engagement and negative organizational behaviour? And which ones lead to positive outcomes instead? How to assess the psychosocial work environment in work organisations, and how to design successful intervention processes and evaluate their effectiveness?
These are common questions facing occupational psychologists as they deal with issues related to the psychosocial work environment and its impact on employees’ health and well-being. The aim of this seminar is to introduce students to theories, methods and procedures that can be used to assess and manage the psychosocial work environment in organisations.  

Key topics addressed by the course are:

  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the understanding of different types of job demands and job resources, and their differential impact on health, well-being and organizational behaviour;
  • Theoretical and practical approaches to occupational health assessment and intervention; 
  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the evaluation of occupational health interventions.

Through the analysis of specific problems and cases, the students will be introduced to the challenges of translating theory into practice while dealing with real work scenarios.  

Exam registration requirements: Requirements for passing the seminar are (a) attendance at minimum 75% of the classes, (b) active participation in class as described in the course content for the individual seminar class.

Final exam: No final exam. The course is a passed/not passed course based on participation

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15110u/2019-2020

Literature

Nudges towards better decisions v/ Robert Böhm (7.5 ECTS)

Tuesday 3-5 pm., CSS room 2-2-36, teaching weeks 6-14 and 16-20

Robert Böhm

Course description:
Consuming environmentally-friendly products, registering as an organ donor, or receiving a vaccination – these decisions may have important consequences for the decision mak-er but also for society. How can one increase the quality of individual decisions while not blocking certain options and therefore restricting the decision makers’ freedom of choice? This course deals with the question how to change the choice architecture in order to im-prove decisions, so-called “nudges”. The course will cover (a) nudges’ theoretical founda-tion, (b) various examples of application in different areas of decision making, and (c) how to integrate nudges into policy making. It utilizes a multi-disciplinary perspective on human decision-making, including research papers from psychology, philosophy, eco-nomics, and related areas.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15744u/2019-2020

Literature coming soon.