Courses in English - Autumn 2018

The courses offered are subject to change. Time, syllabus and descriptions to be updated...

Courses offered on Bachelor's level:

  1. Social Psychological Theory
  2. Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology
  3. Cancelled - Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease
  4. Psychology of Morality
  5. Culture, Communication and Learning
  6. Feedback Informed Treatment
  7. Brain and Cognitive Development

Courses offered on Master's level:

  1. Culture, Communication and Learning
  2. Feedback Informed Treatment
  3. Brain and Cognitive Development
  4. Cancelled - Development of measurement tools
  5. The Psychosocial Work Environment
  6. Health Psychology - Chronic Illness


Courses offered on Bachelor's level

Social Psychological Theory (15 ECTS)


Mondays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 7-0-18, 14 weeks, starts week 36

Kristian Østergaard Melby

The course Social Psychological Theory introduces the student to the subject field of social psychology. Here is the central focus on the relationship between the individual and the society and in particular how the former gets integrated in to the latter.

In answering the question of social integration, the course deals with two different overarching approaches: The psychological social psychology where the individual is the main focus, and sociological social psychology where it is the society. Based on group work, student and teacher presentations, we explore older and contemporary social psychological theories focusing on concepts such as individualisation processes, groups, attitudes, roles etc. In applying the theories, topics such as family, youth, integration, identity, culture and ethnicity are discussed.

Exam registration requirements: 75 % attendance, active participation such as student presentations, group work, discussions and response papers.

Final exam: Final compulsory written 72-hour take-home assignment. The written take-home assignment can only be taken individually. The extent of the written take-home assignment is a maximum of ten standard pages.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb16001u/2018-2019

Literature

Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology (5 ECTS)


Lectures, Fridays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 35.01.05, 14 weeks, starts week 36

Jesper Mogensen

Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology include the normal as well as the disordered and injured anatomy, physiology and neurochemistry.

Central course themes are:

  • Basic genetics and genetic versus non-genetic factors in the development of normal as well as pathological processes within the areas of psychology, neurobiology, psychiatry and neurology.
  • The prenatal (embryology) and postnatal development of the nervous system.
  • Psychopathology (psychiatry) and neuropathology from a biological and neurobiological perspective, including psycho- and neuropharmacology.
  • The organic (mainly neural) substrate involved in cognitive processes.
  • The functions of the nervous system.

Final exam: Written examination, 2 hours under invigilation. Multiple choice exam

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb11005u/2018-2019

Literature

Cancelled - Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease (5 ECTS)


Thursdays 1 p.m. - 3 p.m., CSS room TBA, 14 weeks, starts week 36

Jesper Kristiansen

Can psychosocial conditions at work cause disease? What are the mechanisms? How do we assess and quantify psychosocial conditions and their effects? How can we intervene against job stress? These and other questions are the topics for the course. The course is interdisciplinary, and will introduce commonly used models of work-related stress, as well as broadly applicable methods for measuring the physiological effects of stress on the body. These methods are useful in understanding the effects of job stress and psychosocial stressors on health and wellbeing, with applications for cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression, metabolic illness, and other chronic diseases. The course includes both structured lectures that introduce and review various concepts and methods, and group work were where students are encouraged to engage with fellow students and researchers. These lectures and group work cover topics such as models of psychosocial job stress, mechanisms between psychosocial job stress and health, critical discussion of the association between job stress and chronic diseases, and job stress interventions.

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation.

Final exam: Free written exam to be handed in at the end of the course. The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum three students. Length of the paper: max. 8 pages for 1 student, max.12 pages for 2 students, max. 14 pages for 3 students.

 

Literature (coming soon, around mid-June)

Psychology of Morality (5 ECTS)

Thursdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room  2-1-42, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Karolina Scigala

Is morality innate? Does cleaning your hands influence your moral decision making? Are creative people less or more honest?

During the course, we will discuss research aiming to answer such questions related to morality, typically relying on experimental approaches (like in Behavioral Economics). In particular, students will learn about modern theories of moral behavior, as well as about quantitative lab and field studies on individual and situational factors related to (im)moral behaviors such as altruism, cheating, or cooperativeness. We will focus on a broad range of topics including cognitive and emotional aspects of moral judgments and decision making, moral development, or evolutionary and neurobiological aspects of morality. 

Exam registration requirements: A minimum of 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation

Final exam: Free written exam to be handed in at the end of the course. Students are asked to write a 5-page (APA-guidelines) review paper on a self-chosen topic that was subject in one of the sessions. The review paper should provide an overview of the current research knowledge. The exam can only be taken individually.
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb05107u/2018-2019

Culture, Communication and Learning (10 ECTS)


Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room 2-2-30, 14 weeks, starts week 36

Kyoko Murakami

This course will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of communication and language in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the dynamic role of social interaction in language use, culture as resource for development of children and young people, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together and the process of socialisation (3) learning as communicative action and (4) gender issues in language and literacy practices or disability issues. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in practices in psychology, education and other related fields.  

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having read required pre-session reading beforehand and prepared to discuss the reading in the seminar. 

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in a given culture in formal or informal learning settings
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, language, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early years and other educational settings.

Exam registration requirements: For all elective subjects, minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. In addition, a group or individual student presentation is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment

Final exam: The course concludes with an assignment of max. 14 pages for one student, 21 pages for two students and 24 pages for three students.To be submitted according to the exam schedule. 
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb05134u/2018-2019

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (10 ECTS)   


Wednesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room  7-0-40 , 10 weeks, starts week 36 

Rikke Papsøe 

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.  

Exam registration requirements: A minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. Active participation in class is a precondition to be able to write the exam paper. In each session of the course, students participate in group discussions on relevant topics and cases from practice, and they demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the following class reflection. Students also participate in training with therapeutic methods and with the outcome management tools presented in class.

Final exam: Written assignment. Free home assignment. The assignment shall be max. 12 pages by 1 student, max. 15 pages by 2 students and max. 18 pages by 3 students
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb05138u/2018-2019

Brain and Cognitive Development (10 ECTS)


Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2-1-49, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Victoria Helen Southgate

Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

Teaching weeks: 37-41, 43, 45, 47-49 

Exam registration requirements: A minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. In addition, a group or individual student presentation is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Final exam: The course concludes with an assignment of max. 14 pages for one student, 21 pages for two students and 24 pages for three students.To be submitted according to the exam schedule. 
 
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb05139u/2018-2019 

Literature (coming soon, around mid-June)

 



Courses offered on Master's level

Culture, Communication and Learning (7,5 ECTS)


Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room  2-2-30, 14 weeks, starts week 36

Kyoko Murakami

This course will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of communication and language in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the dynamic role of social interaction in language use, culture as resource for development of children and young people, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together and the process of socialisation (3) learning as communicative action and (4) gender issues in language and literacy practices or disability issues. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in practices in psychology, education and other related fields. 

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having read required pre-session reading beforehand and prepared to discuss the reading in the seminar. 

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in a given culture in formal or informal learning settings
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, language, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early years and other educational settings.  

Exam registration requirements: For all elective subjects, minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. In addition, a group or individual student presentation is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment

Final exam: The course concludes with an assignment of max. 14 pages for one student, 21 pages for two students and 24 pages for three students.To be submitted according to the exam schedule. 

You can reade more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15714u/2018-2019                                


Literature


Feedback Informed Treatment (7,5 ECTS)


Wednesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room 7-0-40, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Rikke Papsøe

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection. 

Exam registration requirements: A minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. Active participation in class is a precondition to be able to write the exam paper. In each session of the course, students participate in group discussions on relevant topics and cases from practice, and they demonstrate their knowledge and skills in the following class reflection. Students also participate in training with therapeutic methods and with the outcome management tools presented in class.

Final exam: Written assignment. Free home assignment. The assignment shall be max. 12 pages by 1 student, max. 15 pages by 2 students and max. 18 pages by 3 students
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15704u/2018-2019

Literature

Brain and Cognitive Development (7,5 ECTS)


Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2-1-49, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Victoria Helen Southgate

Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

Teaching weeks: 37-41, 43, 45, 47-49 

Exam registration requirements: A minimum 75% attendance is a prerequisites for submitting assignments. However, the teaching is based on full participation. In addition, a group or individual student presentation is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Final exam: The course concludes with an assignment of max. 14 pages for one student, 21 pages for two students and 24 pages for three students.To be submitted according to the exam schedule. 
You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsb05139u/2018-2019 

Literature (coming soon, around mid-June)

Cancelled - Development of measurement tools (7,5 ECTS)


Thursdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room TBA, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Guido Makransky

This course will introduce students to all of the most important topics related to developing measurement tools (e.g., scales or tests), and will provide students with the opportunity to develop their own measurement instrument.

Tests and scales are frequently used across all areas of psychology, and psychologists are expected to have the knowledge and skills to use and administer these instruments. Furthermore, there are many applied settings where psychologists need to develop a new instrument because there are no available or adequate tools. In general, the need to develop new instruments is greatly increasing, and there is a lack of individuals who have these skills both nationally and internationally. In this course students will have the opportunity to develop their own measurement instrument on a self-selected topic that interests them, or is relevant for their job, internship, or master’s thesis. They will learn about the most central theoretical issues related to scale development, identify a construct of interest, determine how to measure it, develop an argument for the development of the scale/s, generate items, validate the items through a subject matter expert panel, collect a small amount of data in a pilot study, and use the data to evaluate the reliability and validity of the items in SPSS.  Finally, students will gain knowledge about how to write up a report, and will be introduced to state of the art analyses methods from modern test theory (but will not be expected to perform them). Students can work on a scale alone or in groups, but the course will be organized so that students work in learning communities where they will give and receive feedback at each point in the development process.

Final exam: Written assignment. The exam will consist of a written report in APA article format that described the development process of their measurement tool with an Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion section and has a maximum length of 15 pages.

You can read more about the course at: https://kurser.ku.dk/course/apsk15617u/2018-2019

Literature (coming soon, around mid-June)

The psychosocial work environment, well-being, stress and organizational behaviours: issues in assessment and management (7,5 ECTS)


Mondays 8 a.m. - 11 a.m., CSS room 1-0-10, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Paul Conway

Which factors of the psychosocial work environment can lead to stress, poor work-related well-being, and negative organizational behaviours? And which factors are conducive to positive outcomes instead? How to assess the psychosocial work environment in work organizations, and which elements should be considered when developing and evaluating interventions? 

These are common questions facing occupational psychologists why they deal with issues related to the psychosocial work environment. The aim of this seminar is to introduce students to theories and methods relevant to the understanding and handling of specific problems connected with the quality of the psychosocial work environment in work organizations.  

Key topics addressed in the course are:

  • theoretical and methodological approaches to the understanding of different aspects of the psychosocial work environment and their association with employee well-being and behaviour;
  • measurement of the psychosocial work environment;
  • the content and process elements of occupational health intervention.

You can read more about the course at:

Literature  

Health Psychology – Chronic illness (7,5 ECTS)


Wednesdays 8 a.m. - 11 a.m., CSS room 2-2-36, 10 weeks, starts week 36

Timothy Skinner

The aim of the unit is to introduce students to clinical issues in health psychology and to examine the psychosocial aspects of a range of illnesses, and to explore them with current theoretical models and research findings, and how these can inform clinical practice.  The unit will cover a range of different illnesses and conditions and will examine the psychosocial predictors and sequelae of those illnesses.  It will explore a range of theoretical models used to explain the coping and adjustment processes in health care.  The course will also include exploring the role of acceptance based approaches to facilitating adjustment through experiential and theoretical learning.

Literature