Courses in English - Autumn 2016

The courses offered are subject to change. Time, syllabus and descriptions to be updated...

  1. Social Psychological Theory
  2. Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology
  3. Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease
  4. The Psychology of Genocide: Modern Mass Murder and Its Aftermath
  5. Brain and Cognitive Development
  6. Culture, Communication and Learning
  7. Gender, Power and Intimate Personal Relationships
  8. Feedback Informed Treatment
  9. The Feeling of Being

Courses offered on Master's level:

  1. Brain and Cognitive Development
  2. Culture, Communication and Learning
  3. Gender, Power and Intimate Personal Relationships
  4. Feedback Informed Treatment
  5. The feeling of being

    Unfortunately, the following courses will not be available in the Fall 2016 due to lack of applicants:


Courses offered on Bachelor's level

Social Psychological Theory (15 ECTS)

Mondays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Monday 5th of September)

Kristian Østergaard Melby

The course introduces the students to the subject field of social psychology where the central attention is the relationship between the individual and the society. In answering the question of social integration, the course deals with two different overarching approaches: The psychological social psychology where the individual is the main focus, and sociological social psychology where it is the society. Based on group work, student and teacher presentations, we explore older and contemporary social psychological theories focusing on concepts such as individualisation processes, groups, attitudes, roles etc. In applying the theories, topics such as family, youth, integration, identity, culture and ethnicity are discussed.

Literature

Curriculum for Social Psychological Theory

Syllabus: app. 1100 pages
Final exam: 72-hours written assignment, individually
Extent: max 10 pages
Marking scale: 7-point grading scale

Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology (5 ECTS)

Lectures, Fridays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 35.01.05, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Friday 9th of September)

Jesper Mogensen

The topic covers at a relatively basic level Biological Psychology, Neuropsychology, Neurology, and Biological Psychiatry. The major goal is to provide the student with an understanding of and knowledge about neurobiological topics – including the anatomy, physiology, and neurochemistry of the normal, diseased, and injured nervous system. Major themes within the topic are:

  • General physiology
  • Microscopic anatomy (cytology) (of nerve and glial cells)
  • Histology of the nervous system – especially the central nervous system
  • Microscopic anatomy of the nervous and endocrine systems
  • Physiology of nerve cells (including electrophysiology)
  • Physiology (including electrophysiology) of the nervous and endocrine systems
  • Neurochemistry (at cellular as well as systemic levels)
  • Neuropharmacology (including psychopharmacology)
  • Functions of the endocrine systems (endocrinology)
  • Genetics
  • Genetic versus non-genetic factors in the development of normal as well as pathological processes within the areas of psychology, neurobiology, psychiatry, and neurology
  • Evolution of the nervous system
  • Embryology and pre-natal as well as post-natal development of the nervous system
  • Psychopathology (psychiatry) and neuropathology (neurology) in biological and neuropsychological perspectives

The organic (primarily neural) substrate of the following functional areas:Sensory Processes, Perception, Attention, Motivation, Movement, Action, Learning, Memory, Knowledge and Representation of Knowledge, Thinking, Problem Solving, Language, Intelligence, Homeostasis, Biological Rhythms, Sex, Emotions, Stress Reactions, and Consciousness 

Literature

Syllabus: app. 350 pages
Final exam: Written examination, 2 hours under inviligation, multiple choice exam, without aids
Marking scale: pass/fail

Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease (5 ECTS)  

Tuesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room 4.1.30, 14 weeks, starts week 37 (Tuesday 13th of September)

NOTE! First two classes (September 13th and 20th will be from 3 p.m. - 6 p.m.)

Jesper Kristiansen

Can social conditions at work cause disease? What are the mechanisms? How do we assess and quantify social conditions and their effects? How do adverse psychosocial conditions affect the employees? These and other questions are the topics for the course. The course is inter­disciplinary, and will introduce commonly used models of work-related stress, as well as broadly applicable methods for measuring the physiological effects of stress on the body. These methods are useful in understanding the effects of job stress and social stressors on health and wellbeing, with applications for cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression, metabolic illness, musculoskeletal pain, and asthma. The course includes both structured lecturesthat introduce and review various concepts and methods, and workshops where students are encouraged to engage with fellow students and researchers from the National Research Centre for the Working Environment (NRCWE). These workshops will cover topics such as job stress measurement, cardiovascular monitoring of stress response, and linkages between job stress biomarkers and chronic diseases.

Literature. (The Literature is printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on Campus)

Active participation: a minimum of 75 % attendance
Syllabus: app. 500 pages
Final exam: one-week assignment
Extent:
max 8 pages for 1 student, 12 sider if you write 2 students together and 14 pages if you write 3 students together. 

The Psychology of Genocide: Modern Mass Murder and Its Aftermath (5 ECTS)

Thursdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 4.1.30, 10 weeks, starts week 36 (Thursday 10th of September)

Johannes Lang

Genocide is often called the “crime of crimes.” Yet despite the progress of international law, genocidal episodes continue to plague human existence with disturbing frequency. What can psychology contribute to an understanding of such violence?

In general, psychology has shied away from the topic of mass atrocity for several reasons. Traditionally, the discipline of psychology has tended to focus on the individual, using primarily the experimental method to study it. Large-scale projects of mass murder have seemed beyond psychology’s theoretical and methodological grasp. Recently, however, the psychology of mass violence has received increasing interest and recognition from both academics and the general public. Especially after 9/11, 2001 people have wondered about the “psychology of evil,” and psychologists have begun to realize that they should deal more systematically with collective violence.

This course explores the social and psychological dynamics of genocide and mass atrocity, examining perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. The perpetrators are thoroughly described and analysed – from the policymakers, planners, and bureaucrats, down to the face-to-face killers – in an attempt to understand and explain how seemingly ordinary people may become mass murderers. The course then turns to the psychological effects of genocide on the victims. How is systematic persecution and murder perceived by those who endure it? What is the nature of the survivor’s trauma? Is it possible to recover from such events? Finally, we consider whether there is any realistic hope that genocide can be prevented.

The course is broadly based, drawing on psychology, history, sociology, philosophy, and political science. The psychological approach is predominantly social, but students are encouraged to offer alternative theoretical interpretations. Scenes from documentaries help bring the perpetrators and survivors to life, providing vivid material for discussion and analysis.

General information:

  • 75% attendance is mandatory but the course is based on full participation.

Free assignment, delivered according to the exam schedule.

Literature 

Brain and Cognitive Development (10 ECTS)

Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 15.3.15, 10 weeks, starts week 36 (Tuesday 6th of September). After week 40 the room number will change.

Victoria Southgate

How to infants and young children perceive the world around them, and how to they learn all the things they need to learn? This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will cover many domains including number processing, language acquisition, social cognition (including theory of mind and morality), face and gaze processing, learning mechanisms and motivation. Students will also learn about current methodology for studying infants and their brains. Where relevant, we will also explore development beyond early childhood and in to adolescence. The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

The format of the course will be a 1.5 -2 hour lecture followed by class presentations and group discussion.

Requirements: The course is based on full participation in class.

Assignment: The students are expected to submit a written assignment by the end of the course. This assignment is to be formulated as a research proposal related to a relevant topic of this course. The teacher has to approve the title of the proposal no later than 1 month prior to the end of the course. The proposal shall include the background literature, the formulation of a problem and suggestion of methods how to approach the problem.

Form of grading: Pass/Fail

The exam can only be taken individually, but he paper can be written in groups of maximum three students.

Extent of the exam:10 ects: 1 student max 14 pages, 2 students max 21 pages and 3 students max 24 pages

Syllabus: 1000 pages literature, 200 pages can be self-chosen literature

Literature

Culture, Communication and Learning (10 ECTS)

Thursdays 10 a.m. - 12 noon, CSS room 7.0.40, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Thursday 9th of September)

Kyoko Murakami

This unit will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of culture and communication in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the role of language and culture in development, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together (3) learning as communicative action (4) identity formation. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in education.

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having done some preparation reading beforehand and prepared to give a brief summary of the pre-session reading in the seminar.

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in language development
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings, primary and secondary classrooms
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early educational settings and in primary and secondary classrooms.

Course assessment: 75 % participation is mandatory but the course is based on full participation in class.

Syllabus: For BA students, a total of 1000 pages comprising both compulsory (700 pages) and elective literature (300 pages).

Assignment:

Title: Select one of the themes, theories or/and concepts introduced in the course. Present an argument with a critical review the literature on the chosen theme/concept/theory with one or two illustrative examples. The paper can be written individually or in groups of 2-3 students, and it cannot exceed the following number of pages: 14 pages – 1 student; 21 pages – 2 students; 24 pages – 3 students.

Coursework: In addition to the course assignment, a group presentation by students is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Interpretation of Marking Criteria for assignments and extended examination questions: During Session 1, and then again at least one point during the semester, there will be explanation and discussion of the marking criteria in relation to this assignment. 

Literature

Gender, Power and Intimate Personal Relationships (10 ECTS)

Mondays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 7.0.18, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Monday 5th of September)

Christine M. Lehane

Are you interested in questions regarding how power imbalances can shape the course of intimate personal relationships? What creates these power imbalances and how to dissolve them?

Discussions on couples’ power division have generally focused on hierarchical interpersonal dynamics and gender. In addition to these topics, this course will consider both the influence of differing social and cultural contexts in which intimate relationships take place, and the influence of external events such as the development of illness or disability, migration and unemployment on couples’ well-being.

This course will combine social psychological theory and research, along with a practical focus on recommended strategies for the identification and treatment of power imbalances within intimate personal relationships. Through the use of film, group discussions, case study analyses and other interactive activities, students on this course will have the opportunity to critically examine, evaluate and discuss the most important theoretical perspectives and research results within the field of relationship science.

Following completion of this course, students will be able to formulate and analyse interconnections between theory and practice concerning gender, power and intimate personal relationships.

 The medium of instruction is English, which means that lectures and seminars are given in English, and examinations are in English. This course may be of particular relevance for students with an interest in social or clinical psychology. 

Examination: Attendance at least 75%, active participation in group-based presentations and a final written paper.

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (10 ECTS)  

Wednesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room 7.0.22, 10 weeks, starts week 36 (Wednesday 7th of September)

Rikke Papsøe 

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the outcome and alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.

Literature (Articles will be printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on campus)

Examination requirements
Assessment: Attendance at least 75% of teaching aisles and a final free home-meopgave
Censorship: Internal test
Evaluation: Pass / Fail
Group test Determination: The test can only be taken individually, but the task can be written in the group with up to 3 participants
Scope: The scope of the assignment is max 14 pages for 1 student, 21 pages for 2 students and 24 pages for 3 students
Syllabus: 800 pages, consisting of both compulsory and self-chosen literature

Literature

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (10 ECTS)

Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Wednesday 7th of September)

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

Despite decades of scientific research and centuries of philosophical analysis, consciousness remains one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. What is consciousness and which brain mechanisms shape the unique sense of self, implicit in all our thoughts and perceptions? How can we transform the subjectivity of human experience to an objective topic of research? Through the lenses of affective, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, this course explores both conceptual and methodological perspectives of relevance to the study of human consciousness.

The course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are expected to participate actively to the discussions throughout the course, and to demonstrate critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind, as well as the obstacles and challenges inherent to the study of consciousness.

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  •  Appreciate the multi-faceted nature of consciousness
  •  Identify the conceptual and methodological problems in studying consciousness
  •  Discuss some of the key approaches to consciousness
  •  Recognize the strengths and weakness of current methodologies
  •  Trace the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of  consciousness

 The following topics will be covered during the course:

Theme 1: Framing consciousness

  • What do we mean by ‘conscious’?
  • The hard vs. the easy problem
  • Mapping different aspects of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Accessibility

Theme 2: Theoretical Approaches to the study of consciousness

  • Globalist vs. localist models
  • Theories: Baars; Damasio; Zeki; Tononi; Lamme; Edelman; Carrara-Augustenborg
  • The emergence of consciousness and the problem of binding
  • Understanding consciousness from the social psychology perspective

Theme 3: Methodological challenges

  • Objective and Subjective assessments of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Emotions
  • Disorders of consciousness: coma, vegetative states, locked-in syndrome
  • Anesthesia and brain default network

Theme 4: Consciousness applied (selected topics)

  • Schizophrenia
  • Somnambulism and Crime
  • Non-human consciousness
  • Infant consciousness


    Form of examination:
    75% attendance is mandatory but the course is based on full participation.
    Free assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule.

    Form of grading:
    Pass/Fail, internal exam.

    The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students.

    Extent of the exam:
    10 ects: 1 student max 14 pages, 2 students max 21 pages and 3 students max 24 pages

    7,5 ects: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

    Syllabus: 800 pages, comprised of compulsory and self chosen literature.

    Literature


Courses offered on Master's level

Brain and Cognitive Development (7,5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 15.3.15, 10 weeks, starts week 36 (Tuesday 6th of September). After week 40 the room number changes.

Victoria Helen Southgate

How to infants and young children perceive the world around them, and how to they learn all the things they need to learn? This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging.  We will cover many domains including number processing, language acquisition, social cognition (including theory of mind and morality), face and gaze processing, learning mechanisms and motivation. Students will also learn about current methodology for studying infants and their brains. Where relevant, we will also explore development beyond early childhood and in to adolescence. The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn. 

 Format: The format of the course will be a 1.5 -2 hour lecture followed by class presentations and group discussion.

Requirements: The course is based on full participation in class.

Assignment: The students are expected to submit a written assignment by the end of the course. This assignment is to be formulated as a research proposal related to a relevant topic of this course. The teacher has to approve the title of the proposal no later than 1 month prior to the end of the course. The proposal shall include the background literature, the formulation of a problem and suggestion of methods how to approach the problem.

Form of grading: Pass/Fall

The exam can only be taken individually, but he paper can be written in groups of maximum three students.

Extent of the exam: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

Literature

Culture, Communication and Learning (7,5 ECTS)

Thursdays 10 a.m. - 12 noon., CSS room 7.0.40, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Thursday 9th of September)

Kyoko Murakami

This unit will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of culture and communication in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the role of language and culture in development, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together (3) learning as communicative action (4) identity formation. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in education.

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having done some preparation reading beforehand and prepared to give a brief summary of the pre-session reading in the seminar.

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in language development
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings, primary and secondary classrooms
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early educational settings and in primary and secondary classrooms.

Course assessment: 75 % participation is mandatory but the course is based on full participation in class.

Syllabus: A total of 1200 pages comprising both compulsory (700 pages) and elective literature (500 pages). 

Assignment:

Title: Select one of the themes, theories or/and concepts introduced in the course. Present an argument with a critical review the literature on the chosen theme/concept/theory with one or two illustrative examples. The paper can be written individually or in groups of 2-3 students, and it cannot exceed the following number of pages: 14 pages – 1 student; 21 pages – 2 students; 24 pages – 3 students.

Coursework: In addition to the course assignment, a group presentation by students is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Interpretation of Marking Criteria for assignments and extended examination questions: During Session 1, and then again at least one point during the semester, there will be explanation and discussion of the marking criteria in relation to this assignment.

Literature

Gender, Power and Intimate Personal Relationships (7,5 ECTS)

Mondays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 7.0.18, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Monday 5th of September)

Christiane M. Lehane

Are you interested in questions regarding how power imbalances can shape the course of intimate personal relationships? What creates these power imbalances and how to dissolve them?

Discussions on couples’ power division have generally focused on hierarchical interpersonal dynamics and gender. In addition to these topics, this course will consider both the influence of differing social and cultural contexts in which intimate relationships take place, and the influence of external events such as the development of illness or disability, migration and unemployment on couples’ well-being.

This course will combine social psychological theory and research, along with a practical focus on recommended strategies for the identification and treatment of power imbalances within intimate personal relationships. Through the use of film, group discussions, case study analyses and other interactive activities, students on this course will have the opportunity to critically examine, evaluate and discuss the most important theoretical perspectives and research results within the field of relationship science.

Following completion of this course, students will be able to formulate and analyse interconnections between theory and practice concerning gender, power and intimate personal relationships.

The medium of instruction is English, which means that lectures and seminars are given in English, and examinations are in English. This course may be of particular relevance for students with an interest in social or clinical psychology. 

 Examination: Attendance at least 75%, active participation in group-based presentations and a final written paper.

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (7,5 ECTS)

Wednesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room 7.0.22, 10 weeks, starts week 36 (Wednesday 7th of September)

Rikke Papsøe

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the outcome and alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.

Literature (Articles are printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on campus)

Examination requirements:
Assessment: Attendance at least 75% of teaching aisles and a final free home-meopgave
Censorship: Internal test
Evaluation: Pass / Fail
Group test Determination: The test can only be taken individually, but the task can be written in the group with up to 3 participants
Scope: The scope of the assignment is max 14 pages for 1 student, 21 pages for 2 students and 24 pages for 3 students
Syllabus: 800 pages, consisting of both compulsory and self-chosen literature

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (7,5 ECTS)

Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Wednesday 7th of September)

Claudia Carrara.Augustenborg

Despite decades of scientific research and centuries of philosophical analysis, consciousness remains one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. What is consciousness and which brain mechanisms shape the unique sense of self, implicit in all our thoughts and perceptions? How can we transform the subjectivity of human experience to an objective topic of research? Through the lenses of affective, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, this course explores both conceptual and methodological perspectives of relevance to the study of human consciousness.

The course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are expected to participate actively to the discussions throughout the course, and to demonstrate critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind, as well as the obstacles and challenges inherent to the study of consciousness.

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  •  Appreciate the multi-faceted nature of consciousness
  •  Identify the conceptual and methodological problems in studying consciousness
  •  Discuss some of the key approaches to consciousness
  •  Recognize the strengths and weakness of current methodologies
  • Trace the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness

The following topics will be covered during the course:

Theme 1: Framing consciousness

  • What do we mean by ‘conscious’?
  • The hard vs. the easy problem
  • Mapping different aspects of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Accessibility

Theme 2: Theoretical Approaches to the study of consciousness

  • Globalist vs. localist models
  • Theories: Baars; Damasio; Zeki; Tononi; Lamme; Edelman; Carrara-Augustenborg
  • The emergence of consciousness and the problem of binding
  • Understanding consciousness from the social psychology perspective

 Theme 3: Methodological challenges

  • Objective and Subjective assessments of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Emotions
  • Disorders of consciousness: coma, vegetative states, locked-in syndrome
  • Anesthesia and brain default network

Theme 4: Consciousness applied (selected topics)

  • Schizophrenia
  • Somnambulism and Crime
  • Non-human consciousness
  • Infant consciousness



    Form of examination:
    75% attendance is mandatory but the course is based on full participation.
    Free assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule.

    Form of grading:
    Pass/Fail, internal exam.

    The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students.

    Extent of the exam:
    10 ects: 1 student max 14 pages, 2 students max 21 pages and 3 students max 24 pages

    7,5 ects: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

    Syllabus: 800 pages, comprised of compulsory and self chosen literature.

Literature

Staffing Decisions, Work Teams, and Politics in Organizations (7,5 ECTS)
Will not be available in the Fall 2016 due to lack of applicants!

Fridays 8 a.m. - 12 noon, CSS room 2.0.30, 7 weeks, starts week 44 (Friday 5th of November)

Ingo Zettler

This seminar comprises and combines several topics highly relevant to work and organiza-tional psychologists. First, it deals with staffing decisions, i.e. aspects related to the recruit-ment, selection, and promotion of employees. At the heart of this part is a simulation of sev-eral tests, questionnaires, and work-tasks often used in the process of staffing decisions; herein, students take on the roles of both participants (applicants) and observers (decision-makers). Second, and based on this, the composition, challenges, and benefits of work groups and work teams are discussed. Third, we delve into the issue of power and politics in organizations (e.g. impression management, negotiations, politicking at work). Finally, we discuss how to bridge the research-practice gap.

With regard to all topics, the seminar provides (a) state-of-the-art scientific knowledge, (b) illustrative real life examples, and (c) room for discussions.

  • Introduction to the seminar;
  • Job and work analysis
  • Personality variables and organizational outcomes
  • Assessment Center simulation I
  • Assessment Center simulation II
  • Work groups and work teams
  • Power and politics in organizations
  • Integrating research and practice

Literature

Requirements/Examination:

Students can either pass or fail the seminar. Requirements for passing the seminar are (a) attendance at minimum 75% of the classes, (b) active participation in class, (c) good com-mand of both the mandatory (600 pages) and the self-chosen (200 pages) literature; (b) and (c) will be evaluated based on classroom performance and an individual portfolio including brief (1-2 pages), written reflections – both personal and scientific – on the topics of this seminar. 

Quantitative Research Methods (7,5 ECTS/10 ECTS)
Will not be available in the Fall 2016 due to lack of applicants!

Thursdays 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., CSS room 2.2.18, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Thursday 8th of September)

Tom Teasdale

Taking a starting point in the basic statistical procedures and principles covered in the Bachelor degree  (e.g., t-tests, correlation, simple regression and Chi-Square), emphasis will be placed on three topics, log-linear analysis, analyses of variance, including analysis of covariance, and multiple regression, including logistic regression. We will also explore factor analysis. The objectives of the course are to enable students to understand and evaluate quantitative research methods as they are employed in the research literature and to conduct such analyses themselves with the aid of the statistical package program, SPSS. 

Literature

Syllabus: app. 500 pages
75% attendance and active participation in class is mandatory
Final exam: Written examination, 3 hours under inviligation
Marking scale: pass/fail


Discourse Analysis (7,5 ECTS)
Will not be available in the Fall 2016 due to lack of applicants!

Tuesdays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 7.0.18, 14 weeks, starts week 36 (Tuesday 6th of September)

Kyoko Murakami

This course introduces some of the main themes and issues in discourse research using research in discursive psychology. Through this it examines the role of discourse in shaping social interaction and its psychological implications for the study of minds, selves, sense-making and other topics in psychology. The course is concerned mainly with how talk (and text) works in general, about the construction of identity,  about language and how it works, and about the sources of the order and patterning in social interaction. The course aims to demonstrate that we study social life in studying discourse.

On completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • identify some key themes in discourse analysis;
  • appreciate the consequences of discourse research for some key topics in social science, such as indentity, interaction and subjectivity;
  • be familiar with some discourse analytical techniques and their consequences for analysing social interactions.

Form of examination: At least 75% attendance, active participation in class, and a written paper to be uploaded in Digital Exam the last time of the class.

Form of grading: Pass/Fall. The exam can only be taken individually, but he paper can be written in groups of maximum three students.

Extent of the exam: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

Syllabus: 800 pages, 100 pages can be self-chosen literature