Courses in English - Spring 2017

The courses offered are subject to change. Time, syllabus and descriptions to be updated...

  1. Social Psychological Theory
  2. Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease
  3. Culture, Communication and Learning
  4. Feedback Informed Treatment
  5. The Feeling of Being
  6. Brain Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation

Courses offered on Master's level:

  1. NEW! Quantitative Research Methods
  2. Culture, Communication and Learning
  3. Feedback Informed Treatment
  4. The feeling of being
  5. Cancelled! Staffing Decisions, Work Teams, and Politics in Organizations
  6. Discourse Analysis
  7. The Psychosocial Work Environment


Courses offered on Bachelor's level

Social Psychological Theory (15 ECTS)

Mondays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 2.2.36, 14 weeks, starts week 6

Kristian Østergaard Melby

The course introduces the students to the subject field of social psychology where the central attention is the relationship between the individual and the society. In answering the question of social integration, the course deals with two different overarching approaches: The psychological social psychology where the individual is the main focus, and sociological social psychology where it is the society. Based on group work, student and teacher presentations, we explore older and contemporary social psychological theories focusing on concepts such as individualisation processes, groups, attitudes, roles etc. In applying the theories, topics such as family, youth, integration, identity, culture and ethnicity are discussed.

Literature

 

Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease (5 ECTS)  

Tuesdays 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., CSS room 4.1.30, 14 weeks, starts week 6

Jesper Kristiansen

Can social conditions at work cause disease? What are the mechanisms? How do we assess and quantify social conditions and their effects? How do adverse psychosocial conditions affect the employees? These and other questions are the topics for the course. The course is inter­disciplinary, and will introduce commonly used models of work-related stress, as well as broadly applicable methods for measuring the physiological effects of stress on the body. These methods are useful in understanding the effects of job stress and social stressors on health and wellbeing, with applications for cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression, metabolic illness, musculoskeletal pain, and asthma. The course includes both structured lecturesthat introduce and review various concepts and methods, and workshops where students are encouraged to engage with fellow students and researchers from the National Research Centre for the Working Environment (NRCWE). These workshops will cover topics such as job stress measurement, cardiovascular monitoring of stress response, and linkages between job stress biomarkers and chronic diseases.

Literature. (The Literature is printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on Campus)

Active participation: a minimum of 75 % attendance
Syllabus: app. 500 pages
Final exam: one-week assignment
Extent:
max 8 pages for 1 student, 12 sider if you write 2 students together and 14 pages if you write 3 students together. 

Culture, Communication and Learning (10 ECTS)

Wednesdays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 6

Kyoko Murakami

This unit will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of culture and communication in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the role of language and culture in development, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together (3) learning as communicative action (4) identity formation. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in education.

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having done some preparation reading beforehand and prepared to give a brief summary of the pre-session reading in the seminar.

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in language development
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings, primary and secondary classrooms
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early educational settings and in primary and secondary classrooms.

Course assessment: 75 % participation is mandatory but the course is based on full participation in class.

Syllabus: For BA students, a total of 1000 pages comprising both compulsory (700 pages) and elective literature (300 pages).

Assignment:

Title: Select one of the themes, theories or/and concepts introduced in the course. Present an argument with a critical review the literature on the chosen theme/concept/theory with one or two illustrative examples. The paper can be written individually or in groups of 2-3 students, and it cannot exceed the following number of pages: 14 pages – 1 student; 21 pages – 2 students; 24 pages – 3 students.

Coursework: In addition to the course assignment, a group presentation by students is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Interpretation of Marking Criteria for assignments and extended examination questions: During Session 1, and then again at least one point during the semester, there will be explanation and discussion of the marking criteria in relation to this assignment. 

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (10 ECTS)  

Tuesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 10 weeks, starts week 6 

Rikke Papsøe 

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the outcome and alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.

Literature (Articles will be printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on campus)

Examination requirements
Assessment: Attendance at least 75% of teaching aisles and a final free home-meopgave
Censorship: Internal test
Evaluation: Pass / Fail (Exchange students will receive grades in addition)
Group test Determination: The test can only be taken individually, but the task can be written in the group with up to 3 participants
Scope: The scope of the assignment is max 14 pages for 1 student, 21 pages for 2 students and 24 pages for 3 students
Syllabus: 800 pages, consisting of both compulsory and self-chosen literature

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (10 ECTS)

Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 10 weeks

The class will be taught on the following dates: FEB. 15th and 22nd, MARCH 8th, 22nd and 29th, APRIL 5th, 19th and 26th, MAY 3rd and 10th

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

Despite decades of scientific research and centuries of philosophical analysis, consciousness remains one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. What is consciousness and which brain mechanisms shape the unique sense of self, implicit in all our thoughts and perceptions? How can we transform the subjectivity of human experience to an objective topic of research? Through the lenses of affective, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, this course explores both conceptual and methodological perspectives of relevance to the study of human consciousness.

The course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are expected to participate actively to the discussions throughout the course, and to demonstrate critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind, as well as the obstacles and challenges inherent to the study of consciousness.

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  •  Appreciate the multi-faceted nature of consciousness
  •  Identify the conceptual and methodological problems in studying consciousness
  •  Discuss some of the key approaches to consciousness
  •  Recognize the strengths and weakness of current methodologies
  •  Trace the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of  consciousness

 The following topics will be covered during the course:

Theme 1: Framing consciousness

  • What do we mean by ‘conscious’?
  • The hard vs. the easy problem
  • Mapping different aspects of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Accessibility

Theme 2: Theoretical Approaches to the study of consciousness

  • Globalist vs. localist models
  • Theories: Baars; Damasio; Zeki; Tononi; Lamme; Edelman; Carrara-Augustenborg
  • The emergence of consciousness and the problem of binding
  • Understanding consciousness from the social psychology perspective

Theme 3: Methodological challenges

  • Objective and Subjective assessments of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Emotions
  • Disorders of consciousness: coma, vegetative states, locked-in syndrome
  • Anesthesia and brain default network

Theme 4: Consciousness applied (selected topics)

  • Schizophrenia
  • Somnambulism and Crime
  • Non-human consciousness
  • Infant consciousness


    Form of examination:
    75% attendance is mandatory but the course is based on full participation.
    Free assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule.

    Form of grading:
    Pass/Fail, internal exam. (Exchange students will receive grades in addition)

    The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students.

    Extent of the exam:
    10 ects: 1 student max 14 pages, 2 students max 21 pages and 3 students max 24 pages

    7,5 ects: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

    Syllabus: 800 pages, comprised of compulsory and self chosen literature.

    Literature

Brain plasticity and neurorehabilitation:” I want my life back” - neuropsychological  rehabilitation from a research perspective (5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. , CSS room 2-1-30, 14 weeks, starts in week 6

Hana Mala

Recent years have been in the light of great advances regarding our understanding of the brain and the way it is being formed and shaped during the entire life. This course will explore the current knowledge about brain plasticity together with its potentials and limitations. We will discuss the mechanisms of brain plasticity across life span, learning and experiential influences, normal and pathological aging of the brain, as well as neuroprotection and brain repair. The implications of brain plasticity for the rehabilitation treatment of brain disease (such as acquired brain injury and neurodegenerative conditions) will form the common thread during the entire course. We will search answers for questions like ‘What does it take to change the structure of the brain and what is the evidence?’ ‘Can brain plasticity be supported by other means, such as exercise and pharmacology’, ‘Is the change in neural networks always paralleled by changes in behaviour?, and ‘How do we implement research findings into clinical practice?’. The course is built around knowledge from basic, pre-clinical and applied, clinical research with special focus on cognitive and social functions. It will emphasize converging evidence and aspects determining the translation of knowledge from bench to bedside.

The students will be able to describe and account for selected mechanisms of brain plasticity. They will be able to explain and determine which factors influence the plastic reorganization of the brain. The will be able to describe mechanisms of changes related to brain injury and under supervision analyze approaches that are offered to overcome the functional consequences of brain injury. They will be able to discuss relevant themes from rehabilitation of neurological conditions and able to interpret data derived from relevant cases of neurological disease. They will be able to describe and account for the methodology and identify challenges that characterize the field of brain injury and rehabilitation. They will be able to discuss why research knowledge does not always disseminate into the clinical practice.

 Literature

 


Courses offered on Master's level

 Quantitative Research Methods (7,5 ECTS)  NEW!

Thursdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., 14 weeks, starts week 6

Tom Teasdale

Taking a starting point in the basic statistical procedures and principles covered in the Bachelor degree  (e.g., t-tests, correlation, simple regression and Chi-Square), emphasis will be placed on three topics, log-linear analysis, analyses of variance, including analysis of covariance, and multiple regression, including logistic regression. We will also explore factor analysis. The objectives of the course are to enable students to understand and evaluate quantitative research methods as they are employed in the research literature and to conduct such analyses themselves with the aid of the statistical package program, SPSS. 

Literature

Syllabus: app. 500 pages

Course assessment: 75% attendance and active participation in class is mandatory

Final exam: Written examination, 3 hours under inviligation

Culture, Communication and Learning (7,5 ECTS)

Wednesdays 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 6 

Kyoko Murakami

This unit will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of culture and communication in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the role of language and culture in development, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together (3) learning as communicative action (4) identity formation. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in education.

Delivery will be in the form of a weekly brief lecture followed by seminars and tutorials involving individual and/or group work and student presentations. Students are expected to arrive at sessions having done some preparation reading beforehand and prepared to give a brief summary of the pre-session reading in the seminar.

At the completion of this course students would be able to develop:

  • Awareness and understanding of issues concerning the role of social interaction in language development
  • Understanding of issues concerning culture, communication and learning in classrooms with reference to their professional experience in early educational settings, primary and secondary classrooms
  • Critical skills to evaluate research into culture, communication and learning in early educational settings and in primary and secondary classrooms.

Course assessment: 75 % participation is mandatory but the course is based on full participation in class.

Syllabus: A total of 1200 pages comprising both compulsory (700 pages) and elective literature (500 pages). 

Assignment:

Title: Select one of the themes, theories or/and concepts introduced in the course. Present an argument with a critical review the literature on the chosen theme/concept/theory with one or two illustrative examples. The paper can be written individually or in groups of 2-3 students, and it cannot exceed the following number of pages: 14 pages – 1 student; 21 pages – 2 students; 24 pages – 3 students.

Coursework: In addition to the course assignment, a group presentation by students is required, although it is not marked. Students are encouraged to work in a group in order to develop a plan/an outline for the assignment.

Interpretation of Marking Criteria for assignments and extended examination questions: During Session 1, and then again at least one point during the semester, there will be explanation and discussion of the marking criteria in relation to this assignment.

Literature

 

Feedback Informed Treatment (7,5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 12 noon - 3 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 10 weeks, starts week 6

Rikke Papsøe

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the outcome and alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.

Literature (Articles are printed in a compendium for sale in Academic Books on campus)

Examination requirements:
Assessment: Attendance at least 75% of teaching aisles and a final free home-meopgave
Censorship: Internal test
Evaluation: Pass / Fail (grades if needed)
Group test Determination: The test can only be taken individually, but the task can be written in the group with up to 3 participants
Scope: The scope of the assignment is max 14 pages for 1 student, 21 pages for 2 students and 24 pages for 3 students
Syllabus: 800 pages, consisting of both compulsory and self-chosen literature

The feeling of being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (7,5 ECTS)

Wednesdays 3 p.m. - 6 p.m., CSS room 4.1.36, 10 weeks, starts week 6

The class will be taught on the following dates: FEB. 15th and 22nd, MARCH 8th, 22nd and 29th, APRIL 5th, 19th and 26th, MAY 3rd and 10th

Claudia Carrara Augustenborg

Despite decades of scientific research and centuries of philosophical analysis, consciousness remains one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. What is consciousness and which brain mechanisms shape the unique sense of self, implicit in all our thoughts and perceptions? How can we transform the subjectivity of human experience to an objective topic of research? Through the lenses of affective, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, this course explores both conceptual and methodological perspectives of relevance to the study of human consciousness.

The course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are expected to participate actively to the discussions throughout the course, and to demonstrate critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind, as well as the obstacles and challenges inherent to the study of consciousness.

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  •  Appreciate the multi-faceted nature of consciousness
  •  Identify the conceptual and methodological problems in studying consciousness
  •  Discuss some of the key approaches to consciousness
  •  Recognize the strengths and weakness of current methodologies
  • Trace the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness

The following topics will be covered during the course:

Theme 1: Framing consciousness

  • What do we mean by ‘conscious’?
  • The hard vs. the easy problem
  • Mapping different aspects of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Accessibility

Theme 2: Theoretical Approaches to the study of consciousness

  • Globalist vs. localist models
  • Theories: Baars; Damasio; Zeki; Tononi; Lamme; Edelman; Carrara-Augustenborg
  • The emergence of consciousness and the problem of binding
  • Understanding consciousness from the social psychology perspective

 Theme 3: Methodological challenges

  • Objective and Subjective assessments of consciousness
  • Consciousness and Emotions
  • Disorders of consciousness: coma, vegetative states, locked-in syndrome
  • Anesthesia and brain default network

Theme 4: Consciousness applied (selected topics)

  • Schizophrenia
  • Somnambulism and Crime
  • Non-human consciousness
  • Infant consciousness



    Form of examination:
    75% attendance is mandatory but the course is based on full participation.
    Free assignment submitted in Digital Eksamen according to the exam schedule.

    Form of grading:
    Pass/Fail, internal exam. (Exchange students will receive grades in addition)

    The exam can only be taken individually, but the paper can be written in groups of maximum 3 students.

    Extent of the exam:
    10 ects: 1 student max 14 pages, 2 students max 21 pages and 3 students max 24 pages

    7,5 ects: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

    Syllabus: 800 pages, comprised of compulsory and self chosen literature.

Literature

Staffing Decisions, Work Teams, and Politics in Organizations (7,5 ECTS)

NOTE! The Course has been cancelled due to few course registrations.

Ingo Zettler

This seminar comprises and combines several topics highly relevant to work and organizational psychologists. First, it deals with staffing decisions, i.e., aspects related to the recruitment, selection, and promotion of employees. At the heart of this part is a simulation of several tests, questionnaires, and work-tasks often used in the process of staffing decisions; herein, students take on the roles of both participants (applicants) and observers (decision-makers). Second, and based on this, the composition, challenges, and benefits of work groups and work teams are discussed. Third, we delve into the issue of power and politics in organizations (e.g., impression management, negotiations, politicking at work). Finally, we discuss how to bridge the research-practice gap, including discussions with a practitioner (probably Andreas Christiansen from praice.com).

With regard to all topics, the seminar provides (a) state-of-the-art scientific knowledge, (b) illustrative real life examples, and (c) room for discussions.

  •  Job and Work Analysis
  •  Personality Variables in the Work Context
  • Assessment Center
  • Work Groups und Work Teams
  • Power and Politics in Organizations
  • Integrating Research and Practice

 By the end of the course, students are equipped with the scientific knowledge, illustrated via practical examples, about important contents in the areas of staffing decisions, work teams, as well as power and politics in organizations

Literature

Requirements/Examination:

Students can either pass or fail the seminar. Requirements for passing the seminar are (a) attendance at minimum 75% of the classes, (b) active participation in class, (c) good com-mand of both the mandatory (600 pages) and the self-chosen (200 pages) literature; (b) and (c) will be evaluated based on classroom performance and an individual portfolio including brief (1-2 pages), written reflections – both personal and scientific – on the topics of this seminar. 

 

Discourse Analysis (7,5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 10 a.m. - 12 noon, CSS room 4.1.36, 14 weeks, starts week 6 

Kyoko Murakami

This course introduces some of the main themes and issues in discourse research using research in discursive psychology. Through this it examines the role of discourse in shaping social interaction and its psychological implications for the study of minds, selves, sense-making and other topics in psychology. The course is concerned mainly with how talk (and text) works in general, about the construction of identity,  about language and how it works, and about the sources of the order and patterning in social interaction. The course aims to demonstrate that we study social life in studying discourse.

On completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • identify some key themes in discourse analysis;
  • appreciate the consequences of discourse research for some key topics in social science, such as indentity, interaction and subjectivity;
  • be familiar with some discourse analytical techniques and their consequences for analysing social interactions.

Form of examination: At least 75% attendance, active participation in class, and a written paper to be uploaded in Digital Exam the last time of the class.

Form of grading: Pass/Fall. The exam can only be taken individually, but he paper can be written in groups of maximum three students.

Extent of the exam: 1 student max 12 pages, 2 students max 15 pages and 3 students max 18 pages

Syllabus: 800 pages, 100 pages can be self-chosen literature

Literature

The psychosocial work environment, stress and organizational behaviours: issues in assessment and management (7,5 ECTS)

 Mondays 8 a.m. - 12 noon, CSS room 2.1.49, 7 weeks, starts week 13

Dates for teaching:March 27, April 3 and 24, May 8, 15, 22 and 29.

Paul Conway

Which are the factors of the psychosocial work environment that lead to stress, low work engagement and negative organizational behaviours? And which are the factors that lead to positive outcomes instead? How to assess the psychosocial work environment in work organizations, and how to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions? 

These are common questions that occupational psychologists face when dealing with issues related to the psychosocial work environment and the impact it has on employees. The aim of this seminar is to introduce students to theories, methods and procedures that can be used to assess and manage the psychosocial work environment.  

Key topics addressed in the course will be: 

  • Theoretical approaches to the understanding of different types of job demands and job resources, and their differential impact on health, work-related well-being and organizational behaviour;
  • Measurement methods in the field of the psychosocial work environment;
  • The content and process elements of occupational health intervention. 

Through the analysis of specific problems and cases, the students will deal with the challenges of translating theory into practice, especially when it comes to adapting one’s approach to suit the specific situation examined.  

At the end of the course, a student should have learned the basics for: 

  • Identifying the most influential theories and methodological approaches in the field of the psychosocial work environment and its impact on health, work-related well-being and organizational behaviour;
  • Developing tools for assessing the psychosocial work environment;
  • Setting up proposals for occupational health intervention plans in work organizations.

Literature