Courses in English - Spring 2019

 

The courses offered are subject to change. Time, syllabus and descriptions to be updated...

Bachelor's Level

Master's Level


Courses: Bachelor's level

Social Psychological Theory (15 ECTS)

Mondays 3pm-6pm, CSS room 2-2-36, 14 weeks, starting week 6

Kristian Østergaard Melby

The course Social Psychological Theory introduces the student to the subject field of social psychology. Here is the central focus on the relationship between the individual and the society and in particular how the former gets integrated in to the latter.

In answering the question of social integration, the course deals with two different over-arching approaches: The psychological social psychology where the individual is the main focus, and sociological social psychology where it is the society. Based on group work, student and teacher presentations, we explore older and contemporary social psychologi-cal theories focusing on concepts such as individualisation processes, groups, attitudes, roles etc. In applying the theories, topics such as family, youth, integration, identity, cul-ture and ethnicity are discussed.

The purpose of the course is to provide the student with theories with which to grasp to complexity and challenges in social integration.

The student will have learned to:

  • Coherently describe selected social psychological concepts, theories and empirical material.
  • Underline main equalities and differences between the treated concepts, theories and empirical material.
  • Account for causes and effects of these equalities and differences.
  • Select and balance theories, concepts and empirical material which is especially relevant in the clarification of a given problem area.
  • Describe strengths and weaknesses concerning the treated concepts, theories and empirical material, in order to clarify certain themes and problem areas within social psychology.
  • The classes consist of teacher presentations, active student participation and re-flection on relevant visual material.

Literature

Brain plasticity and neurorehabilitation: ” I want my life back” - neuropsychological rehabilitation from a research perspective (5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 8am-10am, CSS room 2-2-36, 14 weeks, starting week 6

Hana Mala

Recent years have been in the light of great advances regarding our understanding of the brain and the way it is being formed and shaped during the entire life. This course will explore the current knowledge about brain plasticity together with its potentials and limitations. We will discuss the mechanisms of brain plasticity across life span, learning and experiential influences, normal and pathological aging of the brain, as well as neuroprotection and brain repair. The implications of brain plasticity for the rehabilitation treatment of brain disease (such as acquired brain injury and neurodegenerative conditions) will form the common thread during the entire course. We will search answers for questions like ‘What does it take to change the structure of the brain and what is the evidence?’ ‘Can brain plasticity be supported by other means, such as exercise and pharmacology’, ‘Is the change in neural networks always paralleled by changes in behaviour?, and ‘How do we implement research findings into clinical practice?’. The course is built around knowledge from basic, pre-clinical and applied, clinical research with special focus on cognitive and social functions. It will emphasize converging evidence and aspects determining the translation of knowledge from bench to bedside. 

Literature

Psychosocial Job Stress and Chronic Disease (5 ECTS)

Monsdays 1pm-3pm, CSS room 2-2-36, 14 weeks, starting week 6

Jesper Kristiansen

Can psychosocial conditions at work cause disease? What are the mechanisms? Which psychosocial work conditions cause stress, and how do we assess and quantify these conditions? How can we intervene against job stress? These and other questions are the topics for the course. The course is interdisciplinary, and it will introduce the history and basic concepts of stress, commonly used models of work-related stress, job stress interventions at the workplace, as well as psychophysiological mechanisms that link psychosocial exposures to mental and physical health effects. Moreover, topical workplace stressors will be subjected to critical discussions. The course will be useful for understanding the effects of job stress and psychosocial stressors on health and wellbeing with applications for, for example, sleep problems, depression and other chronic disorders. The course includes both structured lectures that introduce and review various concepts and methods, and group work where students are encouraged to engage with fellow students and researchers.

Literature

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) (10 ECTS)

Fridays 12pm-3pm, CSS room 2-0-12, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Rikke Papsøe

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.  

Literature

The Feeling of Being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (10 ECTS)

Thursdays 3pm-6pm, CSS room 7-0-18, 10 weeks, starting week 6 

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

This course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are encouraged throughout the course to actively participate in discussions and to make critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind. 

Literature

Culture, Communication and Learning (10 ECTS) - Course cancelled

Wednesdays 8am-10am, CSS room 2-0-12, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Kyoko Murakami

This course will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of communication and language in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the dynamic role of social interaction in language use, culture as resource for development of children and young people, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together and the process of socialisation (3) learning as communicative action and (4) gender issues in language and literacy practices or disability issues. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in practices in psychology, education and other related fields. 

Literature

Sports Psychology - Introduction to Sport and eSports Psychology (10 ECTS)

Mondays 10am-13pm, CSS room 7-0-18, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Ingo Zettler

Sport is a crucial aspect of many people's lives. In fact, many people do, watch, and/or talk about sport. Doing sport and/or watching sport affects one’s emotions, feelings, fitness, health, self-view, social relations etc.

In this elective course, we will learn about different psychological and psychological-based aspects related to sport. Examples of topics are cognitions, gender, emotions, leadership, motivation, performance, social relations, team dynamics, or the role of spectators. Next to a general introduction, seven classes will focus on “traditional” sports, and two classes will focus on eSports.

Each class will start with a general introduction about a topic by the lecturer, lasting 45min. Next to this, students will discuss one more specific paper about the topic in more detail, complemented by activities including visits by people working in the field of Sport and eSports Psychology.

Literature

Health Psychology - Psychosocial Aspects of Health (10 ECTS)

Wednesdays 15pm-18pm, CSS room 7-0-28, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Timothy Skinner

After introducing the scope of health psychology and this course will explore the biopsychosocial and lifespan perspectives to the maintenance of health and prevention of disease. The course will introduce participants to the dominant theories, models and paradigms current in the field.  The influence of some of the broad domains of psychology (developmental, social, individual differences, biological) on health will be explored, and how these shape and inform the practice of public health, health promotion and approaches to addressing the social disparities in health.

Literature

Brain and Cognitive Development (10 ECTS)

Thursdays 12pm-15pm, CSS room 7-0-18, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Victoria Helen Southgate

Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging. We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn.  

Literature


Courses: Master's level

Planning and analysis of interventional studies (7,5 ECTS) 

Thursdays 15pm-18pm, CSS room 2-1-49, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Matthias Gondan

Course description: Using examples from clinical studies in psychology and medicine, we review the basic study design in clinical trials, including statistical tests and sample size planning. Step by step we learn how to extend the methodology to adjust for baseline performance, to analyze subgroups, to do interim analyses, to test for equivalence instead of difference, to deal with missing data, to deal with multiple outcome variables, to analyze binary data, count data, and event times, to deal with clustered data (e.g. group therapy), and to compare natural (i.e., not randomized groups). In the end, students will be able to plan and analyze of standard study designs in real world-settings, including basic preprocessing of data, import and export of different files, and standardized reporting. Most of the analyses will be done with SPSS, but the participants will also acquire some very basic R skills.

Literature 

Discourse Analysis (7,5 ECTS) - Course cancelled

Thursdays 10am - 12pm, CSS room 2.2.30, 14 weeks, starts in week 6

Kyoko Murakami

This course introduces some of the main themes and issues in discourse research using research in discursive psychology. Through this it examines the role of discourse in shaping social interaction and its psychological implications for the study of minds, selves, sense-making and other topics in psychology. The course is concerned mainly with how talk (and text) works in general, about the construction of identity,  about language and how it works, and about the sources of the order and patterning in social interaction. The course aims to demonstrate that we study social life in studying discourse.

On completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • identify some key themes in discourse analysis;
  •  appreciate the consequences of discourse research for some key topics in social science, such as indentity, interaction and subjectivity;
  •  be familiar with some discourse analytical techniques and their consequences for analysing social interactions.

Literature (coming soon)

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) (7,5 ECTS)

Tuesdays 12pm-3pm, CSS room 2.2.30, 10 weeks, starts week 6

Rikke Papsøe

Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) is an evidence-based, pan-theoretical practice. It is a way of routinely monitoring the effect of therapy. The objective of FIT is to improve the quality and effectiveness of therapy. Through the use of two simple scales in each therapeutic conversation, the therapist can: 1) Monitor the client's progress in therapy, e.g.: Is the client getting better through therapy? Worse? Is there no development? 2) Get continuous, formalized feedback from the client on the alliance between therapist and client. Through this feedback the therapist is able adjust his/her methods of therapy so that he/she will be more helpful to the particular client. This approach to therapy has been shown to halve "drop-outs" from the therapy, to enhance the effect of the therapy significantly, and to reduce the risk of deterioration. 

This course will cover the research behind FIT, including an overview of what works in therapy. The FIT scales (Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale) will be introduced. Through case material we will practice understanding of the graphical representation of different therapeutic courses, and how these can be used to tailor the therapy to each client so that the therapy becomes more efficient. Finally the course will focus on the characteristics of the most skilled therapists, and how to work towards becoming a top therapist. The course will consist of a mixture of theoretical presentations, case material, practical exercises, and reflection.

Literature

The Feeling of Being: Theoretical and Empirical Approaches to the Study of Human Consciousness (7,5 ECTS)

Thursdays 3pm-6pm, CSS room 7.0.40, 10 weeks, starts week 7

Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg

This course introduces the main theoretical models and the empirical methods employed to explain and measure consciousness. Students are offered the opportunity to learn about the neurobiological mechanisms possibly underlying the emergence of consciousness and to grasp why science needs to embrace also conceptual and philosophical levels of analysis. The course outlines the multi-faceted nature of consciousness by discussing different aspects of the phenomenon in normal as well as in abnormal conditions. Students are encouraged throughout the course to actively participate in discussions and to make critical thinking regarding the current state of knowledge about how the brain relates to the mind. 

Literature

Culture, Communication and Learning (7,5 ECTS) - Course cancelled 

Wednesdays 8am-10am, CSS room 2.2.30, 14 weeks, starts week 6

Kyoko Murakami

This course will introduce key social scientific concepts and theories, which can be applied to the study of the relationship between culture, communication and learning. It will explore the complexities of the vast theory base underpinning the role of communication and language in learning settings. Its aims are to introduce to students issues concerning (1) the dynamic role of social interaction in language use, culture as resource for development of children and young people, (2) language use and thinking and remembering together and the process of socialisation (3) learning as communicative action and (4) gender issues in language and literacy practices or disability issues. It will enable a critical assessment of the construction of problems and proposed solutions in practices in psychology, education and other related fields. 

Literature

Sports Psychology (7,5 ECTS)

Mondays 1pm-3pm, CSS room 2.2.36, 14 weeks, starts week 6

Ingo Zettler and Christoph Schild

Sport is a crucial aspect of people's lives. Doing sport affects one’s emotions and feelings, fitness, self-view, social relations etc. In a similar vein, watching sport can have significant impact on one’s life. In fact, most people do, watch, and/or talk about sport. 

In this seminar, we will learn about different (psychological or psychological-based) aspects related to sport. Examples of topics, which are all discussed from a sports angle, are cognitions, emotions, leadership, motivation, performance, social relations, stress, team composition, or team dynamics. 

Although the main focus of the seminar is on “traditional” sports, we will also discuss aspects related to eSports. 

Literature

Health Psychology - Psychosocial Aspects of Health (7,5 ECTS)

Wednesdays 15pm-18pm, CSS room 7-0-28, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Timothy Skinner

After introducing the scope of health psychology and this course will explore the biopsychosocial and lifespan perspectives to the maintenance of health and prevention of disease. The course will introduce participants to the dominant theories, models and paradigms current in the field.  The influence of some of the broad domains of psychology (developmental, social, individual differences, biological) on health will be explored, and how these shape and inform the practice of public health, health promotion and approaches to addressing the social disparities in health.

Literature

Brain and Cognitive Development (7,5 ECTS)

Thursdays 12pm-15pm CSS room 7-0-18, 10 weeks, starting week 6

Victoria Helen Southgate

Infancy is the period of most dramatic brain and cognitive development, and where we see the biggest changes in cognition. Understanding this period of cognitive development and what drives cognitive development is crucial for understanding human cognition more broadly. This course is focused on the topic of infant and early childhood cognition, and will draw on our knowledge of the developing brain, and findings from neuroimaging. We will begin with an introduction to the field of infant cognitive development, an overview of brain development, and current methodology for studying infants and their brains. In subsequent weeks, we will cover a new topic each week, including both domains of knowledge (including objects, number, faces, social reasoning, morality) and mechanisms of early learning (information expectation, information seeking, statistical learning). The course is aimed at providing a state-of-the-art on cognitive development and will be focused on the most recent research that has transformed our understanding of what and how infants learn.  

Literature